Criticism of Risto Mejide for a photo in which he leans on 'Laocoon and his sons', from the Vatican Museums

Some photographs of Risto Mejide in the Vatican Museums have generated a strong controversy on social networks.

Criticism of Risto Mejide for a photo in which he leans on 'Laocoon and his sons', from the Vatican Museums

Some photographs of Risto Mejide in the Vatican Museums have generated a strong controversy on social networks. The presenter of the program 'Everything is a lie' visited Rome this weekend and gave a detailed account on Instagram of the tour made throughout the museum complex.

At first, the controversy focused on one of the snapshots that the presenter would have uploaded, in which he appeared leaning his right arm on the sculptural group of users 'Laocoon and his sons', dated in the first century. The first reproaches of the users did not take long to arrive and pointed out that Mejide's pose was typical of someone who is "at a bar counter".

The photograph does not appear on the presenter's account.

However, his capture circulated like wildfire on social networks. Shortly after the controversy was increased by another of the snapshots uploaded by Mejide, in which the son can be seen with his back to him, whose arm seems to touch the same sculptural group.

On the website of the Vatican Museums it is specified that it is allowed to take photographs of the works, but not to touch them: «In the entire museum area there is an absolute prohibition on touching the works of art (except for the blind public)» .

'Laocoon and his sons' is considered the foundation stone of the Vatican Museums. It was discovered in 1506 in a vineyard in Rome located on the grounds where Tito's palace used to be. The sculptural group refers to the myth of Laocoön, who was suspicious of the wooden horse that the Greeks had left in front of Troy, but was unable to convince his compatriots of it. While preparing an offering to Poseidon on the beach, two serpents came out of the sea and strangled him along with his children. The people understood that he had displeased the gods by refusing the Greek gift and they put the horse in the fortress. Laocoön's entire body reflects a tremendous tension of muscles, sinews and veins in a cry raised by the death of the three and the imminent disaster that lies ahead of his city.

The controversy happens just a few days after the commotion caused by a photograph of Mick Jagger next to 'Guernica', at the Reina Sofía. The Rolling Stone visited the museum when the museum is closed to the public, and posed next to the famous painting when the rules of the art gallery expressly forbid it, which caused public complaints.

The Reina Sofía then argued that the reasons for not allowing photos in front of the painting is "the quality of the visit" aimed at avoiding crowds and not others related, for example, to image rights.

Yorum yapabilmek için üye girişi yapmanız gerekmektedir.

Üye değilseniz hemen üye olun veya giriş yapın.

NEXT NEWS