Derek Chauvin was denied a request for public defense in the appeals process by the Minnesota Supreme Court

The Office of the Minnesota Appellate Public Defender had previously ruled that Chauvin was not eligible

Derek Chauvin was denied a request for public defense in the appeals process by the Minnesota Supreme Court

On Wednesday, Derek Chauvin, a former Minneapolis police officer was denied a request for a public defense attorney by the Minnesota Supreme Court. He is appealing his 22 1/2 year sentence and conviction for the murder George Floyd.

Chauvin stated that he only has prison wages. He appealed last month to request a delay so that he could obtain a public defense attorney. Chauvin was previously ruled ineligible by the Office of the Minnesota Appellate Public Defender.

Chauvin claimed that the Minnesota Police and Peace Officers Association paid his legal fees during his trial, but was not obligated to do so after his conviction.

Chief Justice Lorie Gildea stated that the justices reviewed his assets and debts Wednesday and concluded that he did not prove he is entitled to a public defense attorney. The court stated that he may apply for a public defense attorney in the future, if unable to afford one. Chief Justice Lorie Gildea wrote that Chauvin argued that the trial should have been moved from Hennepin County, where Floyd was murdered, and that the jury should be sequestered.

In April, Chauvin was convicted of second-degree unintentional, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter in the May 25, 2020 death of George Floyd. During an arrest, Chauvin knelt on Floyd's neck for nine minutes. Federal charges also apply to Floyd's civil rights. He has pleaded guilty.

Floyd's death has been linked to the arrest of three other ex-officers.

This report was contributed by The Associated Press.

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