"Tintin in America" ​​from 1942: "Tim and Struppi" original is auctioned – auction house expects record proceeds

Their fast-paced adventures have made the comic heroes "Tintin and Struppi" known around the world.

"Tintin in America" ​​from 1942: "Tim and Struppi" original is auctioned – auction house expects record proceeds

Their fast-paced adventures have made the comic heroes "Tintin and Struppi" known around the world. An original drawing by its Belgian creator, Hergé, could soon shake up the art world. On February 10, the cover of the book "Tim in America" ​​from 1942 will be auctioned in Paris. The auction house is hoping for record proceeds. However, not everyone likes the drawing.

The cover picture last exhibited in Brussels shows Tintin at the stake, behind which his white fox terrier Struppi crouches. A menacing native with an ax points his finger at the reporter Tim. The French auction house Artcurial estimates the value of Hergé's black and white ink drawing at "2.2 to 3.2 million euros".

Theoretically, "Tintin in America" ​​could bring in as much or even more than another picture by the Belgian comic author: In January 2021, the original title of the "Tim and Struppi" volume "Der Blaue Lotos" after a bidding war in Paris scored 3.2 million euros including fees.

The picture from 1936, painted with watercolor and gouache paints, became the most valuable comic cover ever. It shows Tintin crouching in an Asian vase. Behind them is the image of a black dragon on a red background.

"These drawings are part of art history," says Vinciane de Traux, Artcurial director for the Benelux countries. Next to the world-famous surrealist Magritte, Hergé is "the most important figure in Belgian art".

But why should the black-and-white Hergé drawing now up for auction fetch more than the older, color image from The Blue Lotus? Quite simply, says de Traux: The title of "Tim in America" ​​is "bigger and more impressive in its composition". In addition, he was "better documented".

The Paris auction will take place on February 10th, a good three weeks before the 40th anniversary of Hergé's death on March 3rd. Until then, many more articles about the famous comic artist should appear and possibly increase buyer interest.

The original image of "Tim in America" ​​shows the "clear line" for which Hergé, alias Georges Rémi, who was born in 1907, became famous and which he copied from draftsmen in the USA. It dates from the war year 1942 and was only recolored later. It is a document of its time.

"Redskins" who scalp "palefaces": However, not everyone likes such ideas from the past century. In Canada, indigenous people recently demanded that the book "Tim in America" ​​be removed from a bookstore because it promoted racist stereotypes. In Germany there was a heated discussion about "Winnetou" and the legacy of Karl May in the summer.

It's correct: In "Tim in America" ​​the "Indians" wear feather headdresses and fringed clothing, live in tents and usually look grim. Tim, on the other hand, wears a neatly fitting quiff over his youthful face and looks around with a bold look. He is just as superior to the natives of the "Blackfoot" tribal group as he is to the gangster boss Al Capone in Chicago.

For real "Tim and Struppi" fans this is no reason to break with their idols. The comics stand for imagination, wit and freedom, say Belgians when asked about Hergé.

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