Crackdown on taunting is working the way the NFL intended

The NFL's crackdown against unsportsmanlike punishments is working as the league intended.

Crackdown on taunting is working the way the NFL intended

The NFL's crackdown against unsportsmanlike punishments is working as the league intended.

Officials threw 11 flags of taunting during the first two weeks this season, the same number as in 2020 for the same foul. But only three were thrown over the next three.

Troy Vincent, an NFL executive, stated that "we're exactly where we need to go and we're now experiencing the correction we were seeking." "We saw the spike in the first three weeks, and now we are seeing the decline." Both the coaches and the NFL Competition Committee were pleased. The coaches told us that their players are adapting, thinking about what they might do and knowing it could cost them the team. These are serious penalties for selfish acts.

Week 6 began with a taunting penalty that occurred in an important time during a prime-time match. This added to the public scrutiny of the rule. Fans, media, and players have all voiced their disapproval. The league does not intend to tell officials to stop being critical. This is because the league wants to eradicate foul acts that result in gesturing or trash-talking.

The Philadelphia Eagles had a 21 point deficit against the defending Super Bowl champion Buccaneers and were able to reduce the score to 28-22 with 3 minutes left in the fourth quarter. However, the defense had to stop Tom Brady's offensive and Tampa Bay's offense so that Jalen Hurts could regain control of the ball.

Leonard Fournette gained 2 yards on the Buccaneers' first down, but linebacker Genard Alvery looked at him and ran face-to-face with him. He then raised a flag of taunting after drawing a flag. The Buccaneers were awarded a 15-yard penalty and won the clock.

Avery's transgression was not considered serious, and the NFL received more criticism for making taunting calls a focal point this season.

These calls were directly addressed by the NFL Competition Committee (Coaches' Subcommittee) and the league. Both groups consist of team owners, presidents, general mangers and coaches including Andy Reid, Ron Rivera, and Mike Tomlin.

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