TV is getting more expensive: Sky is increasing subscription prices for existing customers

Users of the pay TV channel Sky have to be prepared for rising prices.

TV is getting more expensive: Sky is increasing subscription prices for existing customers

Users of the pay TV channel Sky have to be prepared for rising prices. Existing Sky subscriptions will be up to EUR 9.99 per month more expensive.

This is reported by the media magazine DWDL.de. According to this, all existing customers whose initial one-year contract expires have to pay an average of almost five euros more per month. The exact amount by which the subscription price increases depends on the package booked.

The price increase is between one and 9.99 euros per month. According to Sky, five percent of customers are affected by the highest possible increase of EUR 9.99.

The Munich media company states the reason for the rising prices: "We invest in innovative products, services and high-quality program content. We are adjusting our prices to take account of the increased costs for program licenses and technical infrastructure."

"We know that price increases are never welcome, so we try to keep prices as low as possible while still offering the content our customers love and the flexibility to choose the right package," Sky continued.

New customers do not have to adjust to price increases for the time being and can continue to make use of current offers and discounts, but are also bound to the new prices after the first year of the contract. At the same time, the law for fair consumer contracts, which came into force in the spring, enables all users to cancel their subscription monthly after the end of the first year of the contract.

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This article was originally published on 90min.com/de as TV is getting more expensive: Sky is increasing subscription prices for existing customers.

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