stern Editor-in-Chief: The return of Karl-Theodor zu Guttenberg and a look at China and Qatar: Gregor Peter Schmitz on the current stern

It was not easy for our reporter Tina Kaiser to track down Attila Hildmann, who is wanted internationally for incitement to hatred, in north-west Turkey, as described in detail in the last stern.

stern Editor-in-Chief: The return of Karl-Theodor zu Guttenberg and a look at China and Qatar: Gregor Peter Schmitz on the current stern

It was not easy for our reporter Tina Kaiser to track down Attila Hildmann, who is wanted internationally for incitement to hatred, in north-west Turkey, as described in detail in the last stern. But compared to trying to get a reaction from German politicians, the search was child's play. Actually, the way for the arrest of the 41-year-old cook and his extradition to Germany would now be paved, because Turkey has signed the European extradition treaty.

But the Turkish judiciary would have to take action for this. The authorities remain silent as to whether she is cooperating with the Germans or whether extradition is even imminent. "I ask for your understanding that the Federal Ministry of Justice generally does not comment on questions about specific extradition procedures in order not to endanger any criminal prosecution and international cooperation," said a spokeswoman on request. We ask for your understanding that we will continue to ask.

When Karl-Theodor zu Guttenberg got on the German political scene, I was a correspondent in the USA. From afar, it was even more astounding how quickly the media and public were at his feet, how he seemed to start pair skating with his wife to the Chancellery. When "KTG" came to the USA, he had his picture taken in New York's Times Square with a grand gesture; the halls at his performances in Washington were closed due to overcrowding. After the plagiarism crash, Guttenberg moved to the United States, but for us journalists he became a phantom. Once I rushed after him across the streets of New York for a few words, but he didn't want to say anything more. Instead, there were headlines about questionable lobby deals.

Cornelia Fuchs and Giuseppe Di Grazia were prepared to meet a man who, after ten years in the USA, is looking for the big stage in Germany again, for example with his new job as a presenter at RTL, which also includes the star. But they met a surprisingly self-critical man. However, also one who likes to throw in educational bits without being asked. Is Guttenberg a reformed man or still a (self-)actor? The best judgment is formed by reading.

The "German-American Conference" at Harvard University has become a fixed date for measuring the transatlantic pulse. One would have thought that this time it would be about Russia in particular, or the German hesitation at the turn of the century (the "New York Times" had headlined a few days earlier that the Germans could no longer be relied on). But it was all about China – the new big opponent?

Ex-Foreign Minister Sigmar Gabriel also spoke about this in his speech. When the social democrat then sat down with journalists from the Henri Nannen School, it was about another country, a very small, very rich, very controversial one: Qatar, host of the World Cup. Gabriel was upset about the criticism of Qatar that Germany had also been backward for a long time when it came to women's and gay rights and occupational safety. Qatar is making progress, why is the kingdom, which is helping us with natural gas and before that with the exodus of our soldiers from Afghanistan, being so overwhelmed with accusations?

Gabriel was unable to convince the young journalists. But how fiery he discussed with them impressed them.

Yours sincerely, Gregor Peter Schmitz

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