Drugs: Federal Drug Commissioner defends cannabis plans

The federal government's drug commissioner, Burkhard Blienert, has defended the planned legalization of cannabis.

Drugs: Federal Drug Commissioner defends cannabis plans

The federal government's drug commissioner, Burkhard Blienert, has defended the planned legalization of cannabis. In an interview with MDR Aktuell, the SPD politician also criticized the current "ban policy".

"We have a massive problem with organized crime, with high health risks, with little prevention that actually reaches children and young people. We want to change that." There is already a high consumption of cannabis. According to Blienert's assessment, the legalization plans will not lead to an increase.

Cannabis as a gateway drug for a drug career - this thesis has been "scientifically refuted" from the point of view of the officer. Allowing cannabis for adults under secure conditions means more protection. "It has to be clear that there shouldn't be any advertising for these products. That has to apply to all drugs - actually also to alcohol. It doesn't belong in the shop counter, it doesn't belong in the sight of children and young people."

The Union has a completely different opinion: The parliamentary manager of the Union faction, Thorsten Frei (CDU), called the project "dangerous and naive" in the "Rheinische Post". "We will clearly reject such nonsense in the Bundestag."

Lauterbach as health minister "out of place"

The reality is misjudged and the dangerous consequences that consumption can have, especially for young people, are downplayed. Karl Lauterbach (SPD) as Minister of Health was "out of place," said Frei. The CSU also continues to reject the plans. The deputy leader of the Union parliamentary group, Dorothee Bär (CSU), spoke in the “Augsburger Allgemeine” of a frontal attack on child and youth protection.

The concept of the traffic light coalition envisages that in Germany the possession of a maximum of 25 grams of cannabis and the cultivation of a maximum of three plants should be exempt from punishment. The purchase of the drug should at least be legally possible via detours. Lauterbach and Agriculture Minister Cem Özdemir (Greens) presented the plans yesterday. The legislation is scheduled to start in April.

Jakob Maske, spokesman for the professional association of pediatricians, told the "Stuttgarter Zeitung" and the "Stuttgarter Nachrichten": "We welcome the fact that Lauterbach now wants to put the protection of children and young people in the foreground. How exactly he wants to do that is up to you not apparent from the current draft."

Rules for controlled enjoyment

According to the plans, "non-profit" associations with a maximum of 500 members may collectively grow cannabis for recreational purposes and only sell it to members for their own consumption. The minimum age is 18. The clubs must appoint youth protection, addiction and prevention officers and are not allowed to advertise themselves. Membership in more than one club is prohibited.

The German Hemp Association only sees an interim solution in the club model, since the clubs are mainly designed for people who consume a lot. "For occasional consumers, the hurdles of membership are too high," spokesman Georg Wurth told the editorial network Germany. But the clubs are a good start.

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