Debate about stricter gun laws: Democrat Justin Jones is allowed back into the Nashville Parliament after being kicked out – for the time being

After the unusual expulsion of two black representatives from the Tennessee state legislature, one of them has now been sworn in again.

Debate about stricter gun laws: Democrat Justin Jones is allowed back into the Nashville Parliament after being kicked out – for the time being

After the unusual expulsion of two black representatives from the Tennessee state legislature, one of them has now been sworn in again. Surrounded by supporters, Democrat Justin Jones took his oath of office on the steps of the Capitol in Nashville on Monday (local time), US media reported. The 27-year-old returns to the Republican-led House of Representatives. The expulsion of Jones and Justin Pearson by vote sparked national outrage last week. Racism accusations were raised. The case also highlighted the country's divisions over gun control.

The two MPs had called for stricter gun laws at a demonstration in Parliament after three children and three adults were shot dead in a shooting spree at a Nashville elementary school at the end of March. A white MP who was also scheduled to be expelled last week narrowly survived the vote. The Republicans accused the Democrats of bringing disorder and dishonor to the House of Representatives and disrupting the work of the House of Representatives by their protest. Republicans have denied allegations of racism. After the exclusion there were protests.

"No expulsion, no attempt to silence us will stop us, only spur and strengthen our movement," Jones said Monday, according to US media. "All power to the people!" he shouted with applause. The expulsion made headlines for days. US media celebrated Jones and Pearson as new political stars. President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris campaigned for the young MPs, as did ex-US President Barack Obama. Pearson, also a Democrat, is scheduled to be voted on Wednesday for reinstatement, US media reported.

Jones may initially return to Parliament only temporarily. This was made possible by a vote in the city council, which was unanimously in his favor on Monday. The Council may nominate provisional replacement candidates. In a special election, however, Jones has to run again for MPs. The event in the Tennessee State House is extremely unusual. In many states there is the possibility of expelling deputies. However, this approach is not the political norm and is not usually used as a weapon against political opponents.

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