Tradition: Fresh Easter grass: This is how you make your own natural Easter decorations

Easter grass is said to be positive in many ways: green represents hope, growth for spring - or the end of winter.

Tradition: Fresh Easter grass: This is how you make your own natural Easter decorations

Easter grass is said to be positive in many ways: green represents hope, growth for spring - or the end of winter. Apart from that, it is a nice tradition for children to watch the sprouts sprout up (similar to cress). So that the grass is "ready" by Easter and can be used as a natural decoration, you need to start sowing on time. We have summarized for you when the best time is and which seeds are suitable.

Depending on which seeds you choose, the grass needs three to four weeks in advance - from germination to sprouting to harvest. For this reason, it is better to start sowing too early rather than too late so that the fresh greens are practically ready to use by Easter. To promote the growth of Easter grass, a warm and bright location (for example on the windowsill or near the radiator) is recommended. As far as seeds are concerned, wheat and spelled grains as well as oats, barley or so-called cat grass are particularly suitable as natural and sustainable Easter decorations.

There are two ways to sow Easter grass - either in fresh soil (peat-free if possible) or on cotton wool, as you probably know from growing cress. A saucer, a shallow bowl or a flower coaster can be used as a container. If you would like to use the grass as decoration, you can also grow the seeds in a jam jar, empty eggshells or a small vase. The effect is particularly beautiful when the blades of grass shoot up. But first things first:

And two more tips: Make sure that the soil is and stays moist (but not wet). And if you use cotton wool instead of soil, it obviously doesn't need to be covered.

After Easter you can use the grass for something else instead of throwing it in the trash straight away. For example, if you (or your children) own a rodent, you can feed the fresh greens to rabbits or guinea pigs. Cats also enjoy the fresh blades of grass, which they like to nibble on. Another idea is to plant the Easter grass in the garden, as long as you haven't cut off the roots - it will continue to grow there. Alternatively, you can dry the grass and then use it as craft material, decoration or for the next Easter baskets next year. This is still cheaper and more sustainable than using dyed wood wool or plastic grass.

Sources: Utopia, Ökotest

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