The new iPad is here: from stepchild to Apple sympathizer?

iPad Pro, iPad Air or the traditional iPad? For prospective buyers of a new tablet from Apple, this question has actually answered itself to this day: the basic version was too beat-up and old-fashioned compared to the Air or Pro.

The new iPad is here: from stepchild to Apple sympathizer?

iPad Pro, iPad Air or the traditional iPad? For prospective buyers of a new tablet from Apple, this question has actually answered itself to this day: the basic version was too beat-up and old-fashioned compared to the Air or Pro. For many, the lower price could probably not change anything. But since October 26th, the completely renewed standard iPad has been available in Apple stores around the world. Has the gaping gap to the in-house competitors closed? Can the tablet keep up under the hood? Is it worth buying? The news agency spot on news had the opportunity to test the newly designed iPad before the official start of sales.

The first glance alone provides information about where the journey for the new iPad is headed: Externally, the 10th generation of the iPad can no longer be distinguished from the current iPad Air, apart from the smallest details. The old robe was completely discarded. The dimensions are now similar to those of its marginally larger brother: The new iPad is slightly higher, wider, deeper and heavier. In principle, the differences are negligible for consumers. Like the iPhones and the other iPads some time ago, the new iPad has been given a facelift in terms of design and now blends in with the somewhat more angular Apple products that have dominated the look for several years.

10.9-inch display with a 2360x1640 resolution, 12 MP wide-angle camera, up to 256 GB of memory, same battery capacity. The similarities between iPad Air and iPad cannot be overlooked. There is no deviation in many important specifications. The main differences between the two tablets are the colors (the iPad Air is available in space grey, polar star, rose, violet and blue; the iPad in silver, blue, yellow and a stronger rose) and the Apple Pencil compatibility. Unfortunately, the second Pencil generation is still not available for the iPad, which is a shame. The cumbersome way of having to charge the outdated old-school pencil via an adapter because of the missing Lightning interface is also suboptimal.

The iPad relies on the A14 Bionic chip and, in contrast to the iPad Air with the M1 chip and the iPad Pro with the M2 chip, has a significant speed deficit and a few less horsepower under the hood. But for a standard user, this is hardly recognizable. You only notice this difference in graphics-intensive programs or high-resolution games. Depending on the version, the iPad is available from 579 to 979 euros, the iPad Air from 769 to 1,169 euros and the iPad Pro from 1,049 to 3,024 euros.

As a flagship, the iPad Pro remains unthreatened by the new iPad. If the high-end tablet is out of the question, Apple is now spoiled for choice. The iPad Air has serious raison d'être to worry about as the tenth generation of Apple's standard tablet nearly fills the gap. Especially compared to the ninth iPad generation, Apple has made a giant leap. The only flaw in the new iPad that is unnecessary from the user's point of view is its incompatibility with the second-generation Apple Pencil. If you don't use a stylus, there's hardly anything that speaks against buying an iPad.

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