“Tatort” with Ulrich Tukur: Mr. Murot is looking for happiness – and learns to love misfortune

Felix Murot (Ulrich Tukur) and his colleague Magda Waechter (Barbara Philipp) have to deal with a strange series of murders: two bodies are found, both of which had their navels removed and a port placed with which they could be docked to an umbilical cord.

“Tatort” with Ulrich Tukur: Mr. Murot is looking for happiness – and learns to love misfortune

Felix Murot (Ulrich Tukur) and his colleague Magda Waechter (Barbara Philipp) have to deal with a strange series of murders: two bodies are found, both of which had their navels removed and a port placed with which they could be docked to an umbilical cord. Both bankers gambled away a large sum of capital shortly before their deaths. Murot goes on a search and comes across a strange community that is lured by the promise of happiness. The next morning he wakes up with a port in place of his belly button - and believes he has experienced complete happiness.

As with every "crime scene" with Ulrich Tukur, this episode offers much more than just a criminal case to be solved: "Murot and the Paradise" contains a wealth of allusions to film history, from Kubrick's "2001" to Tarantino's "Inglourious Basterds". Cinephiles will too This time we were able to make many discoveries again.

At the same time, this episode (written and directed by Florian Gallenberger) is a kind of cemetery for the deposed “crime scene” detectives: from Eva Mattes (played Klara Blum from the Konstanz police from 2002 to 2016), to Martin Wuttke (investigated from 2008 to 2015 as Andreas Keppler in Leipzig) to Peter Jordan (was seen as Uwe Kohnau alongside Cenk Batu between 2008 and 2012), several well-known actors from the crime series can be seen in small roles.

As is often the case with this investigator, the case takes a backseat to Murot's absurd experiences. Anyone expecting a classic crime thriller will be disappointed.

Felix Murot suffers from depression and tries to find happiness and the meaning of life in long conversations with his analyst. In fact, the investigator's suffering is written all over his face: "You're not suffering from inner emptiness - you're actually suffering from the world," he hears. In the end, Murot comes to a surprising conclusion: perfect happiness is hell; people are not made for it. "We need unhappiness to be able to be happy at all."

Opinions about this investigator are divided. We think: You have to see every Murot “crime scene”. So be sure to tune in!

Felix Murot also investigated these cases:

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