"Tatort", Part 2: Showdown on the Spree: The new Berlin investigator duo only has to save democracy for a short time

Chief Inspector Robert Karow (Mark Waschke) and his new colleague Susanne Bonard (Corinna Harfouch) continue to determine the exact background that led to the death of the police officer Rebecca Kästner (Kaya Marie Möller).

"Tatort", Part 2: Showdown on the Spree: The new Berlin investigator duo only has to save democracy for a short time

Chief Inspector Robert Karow (Mark Waschke) and his new colleague Susanne Bonard (Corinna Harfouch) continue to determine the exact background that led to the death of the police officer Rebecca Kästner (Kaya Marie Möller). She had been found shot in the head in her own home. Kästner wanted to take action against several colleagues. The group included police officer Tina Gebhardt (Bea Brocks). She was also shot, as was the Syrian refugee Fawad Saad (Aziz Dyab). Karow and Bonard initially suspect a case of structural racism in the police force, but quickly realize that they are on to something much bigger. They come across a far-reaching right-wing network planning a coup. The two investigators must bring those responsible down and prevent an announced assassination.

The film plays with the idea that violent groups are planning the overthrow of the state - not only radical Reich citizens, but also the highest forces from the police, military and judiciary. The large-scale raid against a suspected terrorist group last year shows that this idea is not so far-fetched. Among those arrested was the Berlin judge Birgit Malsack-Winkemann, who temporarily sat in the Bundestag for the AfD. The leading head of the conspiracy group is said to be the real estate entrepreneur Henry XIII. to have been Prince Reuss. Similar figures can now be found in the "crime scene". For example, a real estate agent who finances right-wing organizations and has acquired a knight's castle in Thuringia. Certain parallels to true events cannot be denied, which makes the film shockingly realistic. In addition, there is plenty of action, suspense and drama until the end.

Anyone who missed the first part of the thriller on Easter Sunday should be hopelessly overwhelmed. A brief summary at the beginning is not enough to recap what has happened so far. The story is too complex and the number of characters too large. The two screenwriters Katja Wenzel and Stefan Kolditz simply accommodated too many topics and wildly interwoven them. As a multi-part mini-series, the story could have been told in a more relaxed manner, but the film is extremely overloaded for 90 minutes. As a viewer, you sometimes feel overwhelmed by the amount of information. If you don't pay attention for five minutes, you've lost the thread.

"I only do this one case and then I'm gone again," is how Susanne Bonard (Corinna Harfouch) introduces herself to her new colleague Robert Karow (Mark Waschke). For years she worked as a lecturer at the police college and no longer with the homicide squad. But now she's back and - contrary to what she initially expected - enjoys the investigation. Not only Robert Karow, but also the viewers should be prepared for a longer cooperation and that's a good thing: A promising new Berlin "Tatort" duo is emerging.

Of course, anyone who has seen the first part would like to know what happens next. As a single episode, the "crime scene" on Easter Monday is not good.

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