Plant protection: How to fight plant pests and fungal diseases naturally with neem oil

The neem tree from India is the namesake of the purely vegetable neem oil (also known as neem oil), which is obtained from the seeds of stone fruits.

Plant protection: How to fight plant pests and fungal diseases naturally with neem oil

The neem tree from India is the namesake of the purely vegetable neem oil (also known as neem oil), which is obtained from the seeds of stone fruits. The ecological agent contains a kind of bitter substance (azadirachtin), which is intended to make useful and ornamental plants inedible for biting and sucking pests - such as beetles, caterpillars, lice or spider mites. But fungal diseases such as mildew and snails should also be combated with neem oil. And the best thing about it is that regular use does not endanger beneficial insects such as bees or ladybugs. The only question left is how to use neem oil correctly? We'll tell you.

The application of neem oil to useful and ornamental plants is said to have an anti-feeding effect - it is also said that the active ingredients contained therein inhibit the development of new larvae. Before using it, however, you should know how to dose the ecological pesticide correctly. Just a few drops mixed with water are enough. Unless you opt for a ready-to-use spray mix. There are also two different ways to use neem oil: either you spray it directly onto the leaves of the affected plants using a hand sprayer, or you add the oil to the irrigation water. Then the plants absorb the remedy through the roots and are strengthened from within.

Before use, you should note the following points.

Note: You must then be patient for a few days before the beetles, caterpillars, lice or spider mites leave your plants.

One more tip at the end: You can also use neem oil as a preventive measure or if your useful and ornamental plants are only slightly infested. In this case, you should mix the ecological pesticide into the irrigation water so that it can be absorbed by the roots.

Sources: Utopia, My Beautiful Garden

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