Maybrit Illner: (Not) A strategy in the energy crisis? The solutions are on the table, but nobody wants to promise them

It's a bit problematic when the guests on a talk show are supposed to exchange opinions, but the topic remains somehow vague and in the end everyone just likes to hear themselves talk.

Maybrit Illner: (Not) A strategy in the energy crisis? The solutions are on the table, but nobody wants to promise them

It's a bit problematic when the guests on a talk show are supposed to exchange opinions, but the topic remains somehow vague and in the end everyone just likes to hear themselves talk. What dialogue should arise there? Of course, Maybrit Illner had issued a question of the evening, but it remained vague - as so often. "Traffic light under pressure - no strategy in the energy crisis?" the show was given a surtitle, but there was no gain in knowledge after an hour of political talk.

Guests at "Maybrit Illner" were:

Will this winter be the only one with skyrocketing gas and electricity prices? Probably not. Eva Quadbeck assumes that the topic will be with us for at least two years, after which alternatives could have been created. Maybe, hopefully. Or, as Ursula von der Leyen explained, the EU will not only have an emergency plan for the moment, but a "fundamental reform of the electricity market" and will regulate the prices. Or, as Olaf Scholz just pointed out, there is a "fossil renaissance" that goes against our actual beliefs.

Unsurprisingly, Luisa Neubauer warned against over-reliance on fossil fuels. Of course, they are a helpful bridge for the moment, but they should only be temporary. At the moment, however, there are many indications that the interim solutions are more of a long-term nature. Neubauer therefore demanded: "If you can now build LNG terminals at the speed of light, you can also build renewables at the speed of light."

In principle, Karl-Josef Laumann took the floor, he was also in favor of renewables. But that would all take time and it is only now that the hurdles have been lowered and the expansion is progressing. Too slowly, yes, but steadily. You have to have patience and trust.

But it is precisely this trust that many citizens lack. Because how exactly they should get through the winter, with the increased gas and electricity prices and inflation in mind, the government has not yet given an answer. Ricarda Lang promoted patience. The first two relief packages this year would have helped many, and that will also be the case with the third, which will hopefully be negotiated at the weekend.

It can be, but it doesn't have to be. Because the current government shows one thing clearly: unity is demonstrated again and again when it is just right. The message from Merseburg, said Quadbeck, was the demonstration that we had made up. It would have been better to present a relief package that specifically states how citizens are being helped. Also important are explanations as to what exactly is in store for each of us.

The price of electricity has increased twenty-fold, the price of gas is also climbing higher and higher. Instead of starting specifically and explaining who will be relieved and how, Christian Dürr preferred to talk about the 9-euro ticket. That will no longer exist in the familiar form, but the idea as such of buying a ticket in Berlin and being able to use it in Munich is sustainable, says Dürr. Of course it is, but without a concrete price tag and real implementation plans, it's just a nice thought.

The same applies to Dürr's proposal to convert the 46 million combustion engines on German roads into climate-friendly modes of transport. Nice thought, but how? At least this suggestion elicited a courageous groan from Luisa Neubauer, she was just able to suppress the rolling of her eyes.

Karl-Josef Laumann appealed to the federal government to think above all of those who are just making ends meet when it comes to the relief package. They were not sufficiently taken into account in the last two relief packages, the money must now go to those "who can no longer cope". Eva Quadbeck also advocated thinking first of those who are up to their necks in water and then supporting those who are knee-deep in water. One thing is already clear: the money would have to be distributed quickly, and long-term measures would have to take second place to short-term aid. Would have, should, should, would be nice - since none of those present could make a concrete promise, the whole discussion remained superficial to frustrating.

Only Ursula von der Leyen was able to assure that the EU plans to decouple electricity price controls, skim off the profits and pass them on directly. This should not be to the detriment of the renewables, the companies are allowed to make profits, the fossils should have to make a contribution to the crisis. This intervention is planned as an emergency mechanism that can only have a short-term effect, but at least follows a concrete approach.

Further topics:

This talk also seemed rather frustrating for Maybrit Illner. When Luisa Neubauer followed up during the final lap to explain what she had said several times before, namely that it is time to invest in renewables and stop fueling fossils, Illner seemed annoyed. "You already said that and I understood that too," replied the moderator and finally ended the round.

What remains of this talk: above all frustration. All the suggestions and attempts at discussion that evening remained vague and one was briefly tempted to ask oneself why one had wasted electricity for switching on the show.

Yorum yapabilmek için üye girişi yapmanız gerekmektedir.

Üye değilseniz hemen üye olun veya giriş yapın.

NEXT NEWS