"Martin Rütter – The puppies are coming": Puppy Elli in mortal danger: the camera team intervenes at the last second

A shock for every dog ​​owner: In the new episode of "Martin Rütter – The puppies are coming", mixed breed puppy Elli is only just saved from a busy road.

"Martin Rütter – The puppies are coming": Puppy Elli in mortal danger: the camera team intervenes at the last second

A shock for every dog ​​owner: In the new episode of "Martin Rütter – The puppies are coming", mixed breed puppy Elli is only just saved from a busy road. Dog trainer Martin Rütter is appalled: "It's really dangerous!" He comments on the situation shortly before it escalates.

But how could it have come to such a dangerous situation? Mischling Elli, a mix of old German shepherd and Labradoodle, came to the Doss family in Elz just a day ago. The family had been looking for a second dog to give family man Andreas a new job. The 60-year-old suffered four strokes last year, all of which he overcame on his own and with a great deal of discipline. "Raising a puppy has always been a dream of mine," explains Andreas on the show and further. Having "overcome many handicaps with discipline", he now feels ready for this task.

Animals, especially dogs, can have a positive effect on well-being if they are (past) psychologically stressed. Studies show that the quality of life of patients can be sustainably increased through animal friends, stress can be reduced and social well-being can be strengthened. Rütter knows that too: "Taking care of a puppy can be very positive for people who have severe health problems, explains Martin Rütter: "Maybe that will give him a real boost again."

Nevertheless, the dog professional also expresses concerns: "But you have to be honest: I've also seen people who were totally overwhelmed." Daughter Johanna also fears that her father could quickly feel overwhelmed by the task.

And the very next day, the concerns become reality. Andreas makes his way to the butcher with Elli and the family dog ​​Biscuit. In front of the shop, the bank clerk ties the dogs to a gate. But while Biscuit is already used to the procedure, the situation for puppy Elli is completely new. However, Andreas has no qualms: "Elli has to wait five minutes for me to get the sausage," says the family man naively.

Rütter is immediately alarmed. "I'm really hysterical about the subject," emphasizes the professional. He not only fears that someone could take the dog with him, but also that the four-legged friend would bite through the leash out of boredom or panic. "I'd always be afraid someone would steal my dog," he explains, and urgently advises dog owners against tying up their four-legged friends in front of shops. Especially with regard to nearby roads, he points out that the dog can also tear itself away on its own.

"For 99 percent of dogs, the collar and harness is too loose. People probably think the dog is too restricted if you put it on properly," says Rütter. But if the dog panics or is anxious, it can free itself from the collar or harness without too much trouble.

The fears of the dog trainer become reality only a few seconds later, Elli wriggles out of her harness. "Hey, you're not going to sit me down here and I'll watch a dog get hit?" says Rütter, alarmed. "It's really dangerous!" Before the situation can escalate further, an editor intervenes, runs to Elli and picks her up.

Shortly thereafter, Andreas joins the camera team, visibly surprised. "Did he undress?" he asks. Only later does he realize the seriousness of the situation. "Thank God the camera team was there," he says, shocked, and shows understanding: "In the worst case, Elli could have been run over. Then I saw that I didn't have the foresight in certain things that I might have had before the strokes."

Rütter also appeals to Martin: "I really don't want to imagine what it would have done to the whole family if we hadn't been there." and further "Dad says: 'Oh, that'll be a fountain of youth! I'll take the dog with me' and on day one it's going to be a mess - catastrophe!" Nevertheless, he encourages the family man not to bury his head in the sand and to keep going. "Let's save that as a good learning experience: Andreas will definitely not use this Labber harness again and will walk more safely in the future. I hope that many people at home have seen that."

There is no general ban on dogs being leashed in front of shops, but dog owners are still obliged to supervise their own animals. According to this, a dog should never be tied down in front of a shop - the risk of the four-legged friend being stolen or freeing himself is too great. Even if there is no main road nearby, the animal can injure itself on the leash, be poisoned by animal haters or be bothered by passers-by. If it is frightened and snaps out of the situation, the pet owner is liable - good reasons to leave the animal at home and not in front of the shop.

Which: "Uni Bremen"

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