Indie-Pop: Chemnitz band Blond: With glamor against men

The band Blond from Chemnitz never had to tell their parents and siblings that their own livelihood can be financed through music.

Indie-Pop: Chemnitz band Blond: With glamor against men

The band Blond from Chemnitz never had to tell their parents and siblings that their own livelihood can be financed through music. "Of course we had the advantage that our siblings showed us that making music is also a professional option - that it's not just unprofitable art," says Nina Kummer, whose brother Till and half-brother Felix are part of the Kraftklub band. Their father, Jan, is also known for his music: he founded the AG Geige band in Chemnitz during the GDR era. Blond have now released their second album: "Perlen".

With bass on their ears and pearls around their eyes, the band uses their music to vent the anger about too much meat consumption, too long waiting times at psychologists and too few women on and behind the stage. "It's probably better than 20 years ago, but that's still too slow for us," says Lotta Kummer in an interview with the German Press Agency. Her music is "Las Vegas glamour," says Nina. "It's practically our very own drawer."

"Old white men" in particular often don't like this glamour. "It's not about us in particular. It's about the movement and the opinion behind it. But then I think it's great when people complain. Because then we as a band are apparently part of this movement," says Nina.

Tour planned

The band releases their music on their own label "Beton Klunker". The band is going on tour with the new album this year, and of course Las Vegas glamor shouldn't be missing either: "We have aerobics, outfit changes, magic tricks, pyrotechnics and new gags," promises Lotta.

Even as children, Nina and her sister Lotta played in a band together with Johann Bonitz, the son of a family friend. In 2011, gimmick became blonde. Quite apart from biological family relationships, Lotta, Nina and Johann, who became blind due to an illness, still see themselves as a trio of siblings today. Their close relationship has advantages above all: "You can also argue and then negotiate when something is at stake in the studio. You don't take things too badly, you don't hold grudges," says Lotta.

Although they grew up surrounded by many musicians, the trio says there were never any differences of opinion. Nina and Lotta only remember one reason for a fight in the Kummer household: LaFee. The singer from North Rhine-Westphalia was "the greatest provocation" for her parents, says Lotta. "They're very open to all kinds of music, but they just didn't understand LaFee. I think that's why I liked it so much."

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