Gardening tips: Cutting, feeding, caring for: the six most important gardening tasks in January

Temperatures around or even below freezing are not good arguments for a trip to the allotment garden.

Gardening tips: Cutting, feeding, caring for: the six most important gardening tasks in January

Temperatures around or even below freezing are not good arguments for a trip to the allotment garden. Nevertheless, allotment gardeners should check their plots every now and then, even in January. And not only that: there are also some small (and important) jobs that should be done during the cold season. You can find out what these are and what you need in the following article.

Especially in the ornamental garden, work can and should be done in the first month of the year. Some trees thrive even at low temperatures. For example, roots of lilac, willow or sea buckthorn tend to protrude from the ground. To prevent these trees from multiplying uncontrollably, they should be cut off with a classic gardener's spade (here a model from Fiskars) and disposed of properly.

Strawberry plants are robust. However, they also need some care in January. If possible, remove all diseased and dead leaves; especially from plants planted in late summer. Frost can also push the root balls out of the ground. In this case, it should be carefully pressed back into the ground so that the roots are protected from the next frost.

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Unlike other trees and shrubs, pome fruit can be cut at temperatures as low as -5 degrees Celsius (°C). Important: It should be dry so that pathogens do not penetrate the open cuts and damage the tree. For the same reason, be sure to use sharp and clean secateurs when cutting pome fruit.

It may not be a classic gardening task, but the local birds in particular have a hard time in winter. And looking for berries will be titmouse

They are one of the most popular types of fruit among allotment gardeners. And gooseberries and currants are also looking forward to the valued attention of their owners in January. Specifically, it's about multiplying the sweet berries. To do this, one-year-old canes are cut into 20 to 30 centimeters long pieces with sharp secateurs (here a model from Fiskars) and placed (without leaves) in a pot filled with sandy soil.

Some ornamental plants love the cold. So-called cold germinators such as monkshood or the popular Christmas rose can be sown safely in January. Temperatures should be between 4 and -4 °C when sowing. In some cases, the seeds should be soaked in moist potting soil on the windowsill at home before being released outdoors.

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