B. T. considers: the Mint changed the gakgak-law

Thursday, 19. december was a good day. A good day for Atcharapan Yangyais – better known as the Mint – and her family. A good day for journalism. And it e

B. T. considers: the Mint changed the gakgak-law

Thursday, 19. december was a good day.

A good day for Atcharapan Yangyais – better known as the Mint – and her family.

A good day for journalism.

And it ended up to be a good day for the Danish parliament.

Law no. L43 was adopted, with all parties voting. Mint-the law is now approved, and a clean gakgak-law was saved by common sense.

It took unreasonably long time, and the 83 children who now have a right to be joined by family members, with their families, were bitterly through a lot.

Mint has been the face of the great bunch of young people who were sent out of the country because the immigration authorities estimated that they could not be integrated.

For all others, it was obvious that the young people aged between 13 and 15 years could, for they all spoke English, went to Danish school and had a family that would support them.

Nevertheless, they were thrown out, because the then government and their majority was afraid that the young people were sent to madrasahs in their home countries.

It turned out later, that there was someone who was sent to muslim training. The law affected all kinds of Danish families who had to seek refuge in other EU countries such as Germany and Sweden, or as the Mints in their home country, Thailand.

the Mint ended up with to bring 372 days in Thailand with her mother, before she was finally able to come home to Denmark.

It was thus an emotional moment in the Parliament, as the Mint, her papfar, Frank Thøgersen, and her mother, Ratree, from the tilhørerpladser so the law will be adopted.

the Tears flowed, of course, for it was the conclusive sentence in a case that has been a long and unduly harsh for the family from multiple nations around the world. They have been waiting a long time, and they have lived with constant uncertainty, the way to Thursday's law has been complex and uncertain.

It is absurd to think of today, the Mint and many other young was thrown out at the same time, as several criminal asylum seekers could not be sent home.

of course, It is, therefore, that the majority of the lots after some time came to its senses.

that which can not be explained, nor can it be defended.

It is first and foremost, the Mint papfar, Frank Thøgersen, klubhusbestyreren from multiple nations around the world, that with his willpower, energy and great love for Mint has trumped reason through.

It is first and foremost his work, but others have obviously helped.

B. T. has written more than 100 articles in the 438 days which the case lasted. Journalist His Bach Jakobsen has tirelessly researched, traveled and written about Mint, Aphiniya, Alex and the many families who were affected.

It is no secret that B. T. early decided that we would not drop the matter, before the Mint was on Danish soil again and 'gakgak-law' amended.

It has been a campaign which we are proud. But we are first and foremost pleased that common sense finally prevailed.

We should be proud of Denmark, because we are a country where there is a place for those who can and will.

Mint can and will. Her we are proud of.

Thursday, 19. december was a good day for Denmark.

Michael Dyrby Editor-in-chief, B. T.

Michael Dyrby is editor-in-chief of B. T. He is a former nyhedsdirektør on the TV 2

Updated Date: 19 December 2019, 17:01

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