Vehicle construction: Study: German automotive suppliers are losing world market share

According to an industry study, German automotive suppliers are falling behind in international competition and are losing global market share.

Vehicle construction: Study: German automotive suppliers are losing world market share

According to an industry study, German automotive suppliers are falling behind in international competition and are losing global market share. With an average sales growth of 13 percent last year, "they bring up the rear globally, far behind the rest of Europe (21 percent), Asia (23 percent) and America (25 percent)", said management consultancy PwC. They also came last in terms of profit margin.

Since 2019, German automotive suppliers have lost 2.7 percentage points of world market share - "as much as they have been able to laboriously gain in 20 years," wrote the industry experts. In the race for future technologies and future profits, Asian competitors are in a strong position.

Two South Korean battery manufacturers made it into the top 30 right away, the Chinese battery manufacturer CATL is already in second place in the ranking, ahead of the Japanese supplier Denso, Hyundai Mobis and ZF Friedrichshafen. Robert Bosch maintained the top spot.

Drive true innovation

Worldwide, the industry is building on the successful times before the past crises in terms of sales. But because they could hardly pass the increased costs on to the car manufacturers, profit margins fell. In terms of profit share from sales before interest and taxes (EBIT margin), the German suppliers came in last place in the PwC comparison with 3.9 percent.

At almost 16 billion euros, they are "investing more than ever in research and development" and are therefore also at the top in absolute terms. "In order for these investments to bear fruit, however, they should gear their technology development even more closely to market needs and the competitive situation, instead of chasing long-established trends such as in the battery business," said study author Henning Rennert. In order to "catch up, the former top dogs have to drive real innovations again, achieve economies of scale and quickly develop new growth strategies."

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