Study: Every tenth employee in Germany is addicted to work

According to a recent study, every tenth worker in Germany is addicted to work.

Study: Every tenth employee in Germany is addicted to work

According to a recent study, every tenth worker in Germany is addicted to work. Not only did those affected work very long and fast, they could only take time off with a guilty conscience and often felt unable to relax after work, according to a joint study by researchers from the Federal Institute for Vocational Education and Training (BIBB) and researchers published on Tuesday from the Technical University of Braunschweig.

As a result, they suffered from health problems much more often than other employees.

For the study, funded by the union-affiliated Hans Böckler Foundation, the scientists evaluated representative data from a good 8,000 employees on their work behavior and well-being, which was collected in 2017 and 2018.

Executives are particularly often affected. According to the study, 12.4 percent of them are addicted to work, while only 8.7 percent of other workers are. Addictive work is "all the more pronounced the higher the management level is," according to the study.

Compulsive relationship with the job

According to the study, 9.8 percent of employees in Germany work addictively, another 33 percent excessively but not compulsively. The majority - around 55 percent - of those in employment, on the other hand, carry out their work "calmly".

The scientists attested a compulsive relationship to the job to those in employment who agree with statements such as: "It is important for me to work hard, even if what I do is not fun for me" or "It is difficult for me to relax when I am don't work" or "I have a bad conscience when I take time off".

According to the study, compulsive work is harmful to health. Addicted workers suffered significantly more often than others from physical or psychosomatic complaints, but therefore sought medical help less often. Possible long-term consequences of addictive work are increased risks of burnout or depressive moods - mental illnesses that could lead to lengthy absences from work.

NEXT NEWS