Five times “poor”: buggies fail in large numbers at Stiftung Warentest

Parents only want the best for their offspring, and Stiftung Warentest also sets strict standards for products for children.

Five times “poor”: buggies fail in large numbers at Stiftung Warentest

Parents only want the best for their offspring, and Stiftung Warentest also sets strict standards for products for children. Numerous models in the current buggy test were unable to meet these requirements. Of the twelve buggies tested, five received a grade of “poor,” while only three received an overall grade of “good.”

With average prices between 150 and 460 euros, this is not a good result. However, most buggies were ruined by one test point that had nothing to do with child safety or comfort: the five defective models all failed the pollutant test. The testers found very high amounts of fluorine compounds in the seat covers - including water- and dirt-repellent chemicals that are actually banned according to Warentest. The substances are poisonous for the environment and indirectly also for people, but there is no direct health risk for the child buggy occupants.

But even apart from the toxins in the material, some buggies were not convincing. “Many models are not designed to be child-friendly,” says Stiftung Warentest. In some cases the backrest was so short that children could no longer lean their heads as young as one and a half years old; in others, seats that were too deep prevented them from leaning properly.

In addition, in no model in the test could the footrest be adjusted or the seat folded down completely horizontally for sleeping. Only some baby baths that can be purchased separately or the more complex strollers offer this level of comfort. Therefore, the general recommendation is to only use buggies when the child can sit on their own, i.e. from around six months and not from birth.

For parents, on the other hand, buggies are usually a practical thing; all tested models were satisfactory to good in terms of handling. Easy to open and close and handy dimensions ensure that many buggies are a space-saving alternative for traveling.

However, the good models are not the cheapest. The test winner was the Maxi-Cosi Soho for around 330 euros (plus 40 euros for rain protection). The equally good models Joolz Aer (460 euros plus 30 euros rain cover) and Bugaboo Butterfly (460 euros including rain cover) are the most expensive buggies in the current test.

You can find the Stiftung Warentest buggy test here

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