Aircraft construction: After a near-disaster: now the older Boeing 737 version is in sight

After the near-miss of a Boeing 737-9 Max, supervisors are also focusing on an older variant of the jet.

Aircraft construction: After a near-disaster: now the older Boeing 737 version is in sight

After the near-miss of a Boeing 737-9 Max, supervisors are also focusing on an older variant of the jet.

To be on the safe side, airlines should check the panels in front of emergency exits that are not needed on 737-900ER aircraft, the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announced last night in Washington. Boeing used the same design for the model as the newer 737-9 Max.

On January 5, such a fuselage part broke off during the climb on an almost new Alaska Airlines aircraft of this type. The pilots were able to land the plane safely, and the 177 people on board were largely unscathed. The FAA has since banned the variant with this component from flying. Around 170 machines worldwide are affected.

The older 737-900ER is a variant of the Max predecessor 737 NG with an extended range ("ER" - Extended Range). In the fuselage of this type, as with the 737-9 Max, there is a frame on each side for an unnecessary emergency exit, which is closed with a solid fuselage part instead of a door.

According to Boeing, 505 units of the 737-900ER were delivered worldwide. In addition to Alaska Airlines, one of its largest operators is the US company United Airlines.

United Airlines expects loss after Boeing problem

The airline United Airlines expects a significant loss for the current quarter because dozens of Boeing 737-9 Max aircraft have to remain on the ground. United forecast an adjusted quarterly loss per share of between 35 and 85 cents.

United has 79 aircraft of the type. The aircraft are to be subjected to an inspection. It is unclear when the 737-9 Max will be allowed to fly again. United and competitor Alaska Airlines also found loose fasteners in other aircraft of the type.

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