Danish wolves take a long nap and hunt when it is dark

Pictures from the mid - and west jutland vildtkameraer shows that the Danish wolves are most active in diurnal hours of darkness. the Researchers are now beco

Danish wolves take a long nap and hunt when it is dark

Pictures from the mid - and west jutland vildtkameraer shows that the Danish wolves are most active in diurnal hours of darkness.

the Researchers are now become a little bit wiser on the Danish ulves circadian rhythm.

Through four years vildtkameraer in the Middle - and west Jutland taken 385 pictures of passers-by wolves.

the Date and time is registered, and the conclusion is clear, says senior researcher Peter Sunde, Department of Bioscience at Aarhus University.

- It shows through, that the wolves are active from around the bell 20 in the evening to around 8 o'clock the next morning.

- they are apparently a long nap from around at 10 o'clock in the morning at 17-18 o'clock in the afternoon, he says.

The new knowledge, published in the journal Flora & Fauna are not completely behind on the researchers:

- When we look at the world, so is wolves through predominantly nocturnal. It is the best way to avoid bumping into people, says Peter Sunde.

in Addition, reflects, according to the researcher, to the wolf's prey - first and foremost hjortevildt - are also most active at night.

the Images derived partly from the area around the Aa, which is home to a ulvefamilie with up to six ulvehvalpe. Partly from central Nsw, where there are repeated observations of the wolf.

When there are puppies, see scientists with a tendency to altered circadian rhythm with more photos of the wolves in the daytime:

- We can see that in periods with a wolf pack, so there are several observations of wolves in the daylight.

- There are many more pictures of the puppies, because they have a more blurred circadian rhythm than adults, says Peter Sunde.

The new study rebut, according to the researcher the notion that the Danish wolves should be less shy of humans than the wolves in other countries.

The observed patterns of activity suggesting so is not that the Danish wolves have developed a higher degree of tolerance for people in the densely populated landscape than in areas with less human traffic, write the researchers from Aarhus University and Natural history Museum Aarhus.

The latest estimate is that there are five adult wolves and six pups on Danish ground.

Wolf, who is listed as genindvandrede in 2012 to Denmark after almost 200 years of absence.

/ritzau/

Updated Date: 24 November 2019, 07:00

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