Train driver: Bahn fails in court for a second time – the strike can continue

The strike by the train drivers' union GDL can continue as planned until Wednesday morning.

Train driver: Bahn fails in court for a second time – the strike can continue

The strike by the train drivers' union GDL can continue as planned until Wednesday morning. Deutsche Bahn failed in the appeal process before the Hessian State Labor Court on Tuesday. The Frankfurt Labor Court had already rejected an interim injunction against the strike on Monday evening. This means that the disruptions for millions of passengers continue.

The GDL's wave strike as a pinprick tactic is permissible, said presiding judge Michael Horcher. The court cannot make a fundamental decision at this point about an appropriate lead time for strike announcements. Horcher suggested formal mediation and appealed to both parties' ability to compromise. There are no appeals against Tuesday's decision.

In the conflict, Deutsche Bahn already tried to legally prevent a labor dispute by the GDL, but was also unsuccessful in two instances.

The GDL's 24-hour strike in passenger transport started on Tuesday at 2 a.m. and is leading to significant restrictions on long-distance, regional and S-Bahn transport. The strike in the freight company began on Monday at 6 p.m. It is the sixth industrial dispute in the collective bargaining dispute that has been simmering for months. The crux of the matter is the union's demand for a 35-hour week for shift workers without financial losses.

The railway has once again put together an emergency timetable that ensures a basic service of around 20 percent in long-distance transport. In regional transport, the offer varies depending on the region. Passengers are asked to contact the railway for information about their connections.

The GDL announced the strike on Sunday evening and was therefore at much shorter notice than the previous industrial disputes. With such “wave strikes,” union leader Claus Weselsky wants to increase the pressure on employers. The railway spoke of an unreasonable expectation for millions of travelers and the economy. She sharply criticized the “far too short lead time of just 22 hours” before the freight transport strike. Because of the strike, deliveries to the industry are now at a standstill.

After negotiations failed again, the railway called on the union to hold further talks at the end of last week. The GDL tied this to the condition that the railway had to submit a new offer. The union's ultimatum to the company's management had expired just over two hours on Sunday evening when the GDL announced another strike.

Note: This article has been updated with additional information.

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