Russian Invasion: War against Ukraine: This is the situation

According to President Volodymyr Zelensky, the Ukrainian armed forces need timely aid supplies from abroad to counter the Russian army's new offensive in eastern Ukraine.

Russian Invasion: War against Ukraine: This is the situation

According to President Volodymyr Zelensky, the Ukrainian armed forces need timely aid supplies from abroad to counter the Russian army's new offensive in eastern Ukraine. “What really helps are the weapons that are actually brought to Ukraine, and not just announced packages,” Zelensky said in his nightly video address.

The Russian offensive did not come as a surprise. “We know the strength of the occupier’s troops and see their plan,” Zelensky said. "Our soldiers, our artillery and our drones are responding to the occupiers." In the morning, the Russian armed forces launched a major attack across the country's border against the eastern Ukrainian city of Kharkiv. In an initial attack they were able to capture four smaller villages directly behind the border.

Zelensky thanked US President Joe Biden for the US government's latest aid package. The US State Department announced in Washington that the package was worth around 400 million US dollars (around 371 million euros). It includes, among other things, ammunition for the Patriot air defense system, other multiple rocket launchers of the Himars type with ammunition as well as Stinger anti-aircraft missiles and artillery ammunition with calibers 155 and 105 millimeters. "That's what we need, said Zelensky. Now we have to work on the logistics in order to get all the weapons to the front line as quickly as possible.

Medvedev threatens London and Paris with counterattacks

Former Russian President and current Vice Chairman of the National Security Council, Dmitry Medvedev, is threatening London and Paris with drastic counterattacks in the event of Ukrainian attacks with British or French cruise missiles. Such attacks against Russian territory would not be "led by idiots in embroidered robes, but by the British and French," Medvedev wrote on Telegram. With the "embroidered robes" he alluded to the traditional costume of the Ukrainians. The response to such attacks “maybe” will not be directed against Kiev, he threatened. "And not just with conventional explosives, but also with special ammunition." His Royal Highness's "not fully trained idiots" should also understand this, he said, addressing Great Britain.

A few days ago, British Foreign Secretary David Cameron once again pledged support for Ukraine during his visit to Kiev. According to the British news agency PA, he emphasized during his trip that it was up to Kiev to decide how the Ukrainians would use weapons supplied. Russia attacked Ukraine and Ukraine has the right to strike back. When asked whether this included targets in Russia itself, he said: "This is a decision for Ukraine and Ukraine has this right."

Germany buys rocket artillery for Ukraine

One of Ukraine's most important supporters - including in the military sector - is Germany. And Berlin is now upping the ante again. The federal government will pay for the delivery of three longer-range rocket artillery systems from the USA to Ukraine, said Defense Minister Boris Pistorius (SPD) in Washington after talks with his counterpart Lloyd Austin. “They come from US armed forces stocks and are paid for by us.” The systems cost more than double-digit millions.

Russia recently reacted angrily to the arms deliveries and expressions of support from the West to Ukraine. President Vladimir Putin ordered a nuclear exercise that - like the military parade on Red Square - was widely perceived as a show of power by the Kremlin. Moscow repeatedly threatened to use nuclear weapons in an emergency.

Ukrainian Justice Minister Denys Maljuska said on the sidelines of a G7 justice ministers' meeting in Venice: "These are empty threats aimed at a Western audience, not at Ukraine." The whole thing has no military use and would be destructive for Russia itself because it would lose some allies through the use of nuclear weapons.

Putin is sticking with Mishustin as head of government

Putin is sticking with Mikhail Mishustin as head of government. The State Duma approved his proposal by a majority in the afternoon. Of the 432 MPs present, 375 voted for Mishustin, the remaining 57 abstained, the state agency Tass reported.

Mishustin has held the post of prime minister since 2020; At that time he replaced the current deputy head of the National Security Council, Dmitry Medvedev. The former head of the tax authority is considered a technocrat with no political ambitions of his own.

NEXT NEWS