Refining dishes: Inconspicuous umami bombs: These spice wonder weapons end up in the garbage far too often

A rather boring outfit can become an eye-catcher with the right accessory and a bland dish with just one special ingredient can become a taste experience.

Refining dishes: Inconspicuous umami bombs: These spice wonder weapons end up in the garbage far too often

A rather boring outfit can become an eye-catcher with the right accessory and a bland dish with just one special ingredient can become a taste experience. You don't even have to dig deep into your bag of tricks for this. Almost everyone has some of the most aromatic ingredients at home, but almost nobody is aware of it. Most of the time they even end up in the garbage. Three ingredients that are much more than leftovers.

There are ingredients that are real wonder weapons in the kitchen. For star chef Christian Henze, Parmesan is definitely one of them. "Parmesan is the Mediterranean all-rounder," he revealed in the stern interview. Parmesan brings that unique savory, full-bodied flavor, also known as umami, to food. A lot of this taste is in the parmesan rind, i.e. the piece of hard cheese that most people end up throwing away. The rind is great for cooking, for example in soups or sauces, but it also develops its cheese flavor when added to risotto - similar to adding bacon. When the meal is ready, the remains of the edge piece are removed again.

Even if real Parmesan is marked on the edge, with a seal and lettering, the rind is completely edible, simply wash it well and scrape off the outermost edge.

There is an intense aroma in the peel of citrus peels. The abrasion ensures a fruity acidity - not only in cakes, but also in sauces, risotto, curries. British chef James Simpson speaks of a "subtle freshness" that a few strips of grated lemon zest lend to dishes. He uses them, among other things, to refine fried chicken and pasta dishes, especially with tomato sauce, reports "The Guardian".

It is important that the citrus fruits, whether lemon, lime or orange, are of organic quality. If pesticides were used during cultivation, these settle in the shells. The abrasion works particularly well if the fruit or pressed halves have been frozen beforehand and are therefore more firm.

The last gherkin is eaten, all that's left is the brew in the glass. But you don't have to throw it away. The flavorful liquid makes a wonderful "base for deliciously interesting vinaigrettes," London chef Jun Tunaka tells The Guardian. For the salad dressing, only a little oil needs to be added and, depending on taste, one or two spices. It works just as well in a mix with yoghurt. Cucumber water can also be used to marinate meat, which makes it nice and tender. The easiest way to recycle the cucumber water is to use it for pickling. Like the cucumbers before, you can also use it to make onions or garlic last longer.

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