Party drinks: Slippery and tasty: four cult drinks from the 80s to remix

“Anyone who can remember the eighties didn’t experience it,” said the great Falco (real name Johann “Hans” Hölzel, born February 19, 1957 in Vienna, died February 6, 1998) about what was probably his most musically successful decade.

Party drinks: Slippery and tasty: four cult drinks from the 80s to remix

“Anyone who can remember the eighties didn’t experience it,” said the great Falco (real name Johann “Hans” Hölzel, born February 19, 1957 in Vienna, died February 6, 1998) about what was probably his most musically successful decade. The reason for this for many of those involved may have been, among other things, the drinks they had with his hits like "Rock Me Amadeus". But which ones were they again? Well, if you can't remember it 100 percent, this article will help you get started with four iconic drinks of the eighties.

What unites many cocktails and drinks of the eighties are their sometimes raunchy names. The Kir Royal is no exception: if you don't know that it is a French aperitif, you could also get the idea that it is a sinful entertainment establishment. According to the International Bartenders Association (IBA), the Kir Royal consists of 90 milliliters of champagne and ten milliliters of crème de cassis. Preparation is incredibly easy, thanks to a cocktail shaker

It wasn't until Janet Jackson made the nipple flasher really famous at the Superbowl in 2004. It is not known whether the musician took her inspiration from the “Slippery Nippel” or even drank one beforehand. What remains clear is that the name of the shot was a good 30 years ahead of its time. The layering of the different spirits and syrup makes it an eye-catcher. According to Diffordsguide, all you need is sambuca, cream liqueur and pomegranate syrup. First pour some syrup into the bowl, followed by the Sambuca. This is followed by Baileys. For the benefit.

While Kir Royal and Slippery Nippel have not survived the test of time, Long Island Iced Tea is still very popular today. Two bartenders argue about its origins: Robert “Rosebud” Butt claims that he first mixed the cocktail in 1972 at the “Oak Beach In” in Long Island (New York). Another story goes that Long Island Iced Tea was invented by an “Old Man Bishop” during Prohibition (1920s) in the USA. Not a true drink of the eighties, but like Falco, it enjoyed great popularity in the decade and beyond.

Nowadays, however, there is agreement on the recipe. According to the IBA, a Long Island Iced Tea contains 15 milliliters each of vodka, tequila, white rum, gin and Cointreau. Add 30 milliliters of lime juice and 20 milliliters of sugar syrup. Put all of this in a cocktail shaker with ice cubes and shake it well before ideally pouring it into a crystal glass. Only then is Cola added to the mixture – the Long Island Iced Tea is ready.

Finally, an iconic stimulant shot from the eighties: the B 52. If the party went on longer than your body wanted, then as now, only caffeine helped. This is exactly what the B 52 supplied the party community with 40 years ago. According to Diffordsguide, the B 52 includes half a shot of coffee liqueur, such as Kahlua, a third of a shot of cream liqueur, and cognac-orange liqueur such as Grand Marnier, in exactly that order. As with the Slippery Nipple, layers are created from the different spirits. If the name sounds familiar, that's because the B 52 was the precursor to the B 53, B 54 and B 55.

Sources: International Bartenders Organization, Diffords Guide

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