Nightcap: The “Sleepy Girl Mocktail” is praised on Tiktok as a miracle sleep aid. What can that little juice really do?

Sometimes you can count sheep until dawn, but it doesn't help you fall asleep.

Nightcap: The “Sleepy Girl Mocktail” is praised on Tiktok as a miracle sleep aid. What can that little juice really do?

Sometimes you can count sheep until dawn, but it doesn't help you fall asleep. The body doesn't want to and doesn't want to switch off and the next day you feel as tired as an old balloon. Curtain up for the “Sleepy Girl Mocktail”. The drink is currently being hyped on Tiktok as a new miracle cure for insomnia. In numerous videos, people report how quickly and deeply they were able to sleep with the help of the mix. But is there really that much power in a little juice? What can the “Sleepy Girl Mocktail” do?

Bedtime is the time when the body needs to rest and the head needs to be tidied up. When you sleep, the body recharges its batteries. It should be so. According to the Robert Koch Institute, one in four people in the country complains about sleep disorders. "You feel a lack of sleep very, very quickly. Even after a sleepless night you can see that there are impairments in decision-making ability, working memory, verbal fluency and emotion regulation," said sleep researcher Prof. Dr. Birgit Högl to the star.

With the “Sleepy Girl Mocktail” such problems can simply be drunk away. The mocktail, i.e. the non-alcoholic cocktail, was invented by Gracie Norton. She posted the corresponding video in which she presented the sleeping potion on Tiktok. He's not a great magician. Only three ingredients are used in it: tart cherry juice, a spoonful of magnesium powder and mineral water. A mixture that, according to Pieter Cohen, a professor at Harvard Medical School, is based more on "completely magical thinking" than on science, as the New York Times quoted him. At best he believes in a placebo effect.

But the mix isn't completely out of thin air. There is certainly evidence from science that sour cherries and their juice could have positive effects on sleep. Tart cherries contain melatonin, also known as the sleep hormone, which controls the sleep-wake cycle, and tryptophan. This amino acid is important, among other things, for melatonin production in the body. However, the evidence comes from “a few very limited studies,” says Dr. Rebecca Robbins from Harvard University to the BBC. The same applies to the information about magnesium as a sleep promoter. In addition, experts consider melatonin to be overrated as a sleep aid.

Whether the “Sleepy Girl Mocktail” actually helps with napping or is just a joke, the drink is definitely not harmful. "There are a few things I like about this trend," says Robbins. Many people relied on alcohol as a nightcap. The mocktail is a good non-alcoholic alternative. If you have problems with sleep, you can also stick to the classics: early, light dinner; Incorporate sports and relaxation phases into the day; Turn off your cell phone, TV and laptop early before going to sleep.

Sources: Kirsch Study 1, Kirsch Study 2, Kirsch Study 3, Magnesium Study, Robert Koch Institute, New York Times, BBC

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