Exhausted?: When work makes you ill - eight tips against exhaustion at work

Andreas Scheuermann, Managing Director of the consulting company Auctority, comments on the findings in an interview with the star: "People between 30 and 39 years also state that they experience the most exhaustion in their environment and that they find it difficult to get rid of exhaustion.

Exhausted?: When work makes you ill - eight tips against exhaustion at work

Andreas Scheuermann, Managing Director of the consulting company Auctority, comments on the findings in an interview with the star: "People between 30 and 39 years also state that they experience the most exhaustion in their environment and that they find it difficult to get rid of exhaustion. We have So a generation on which we are currently dumping the entire workload." In numbers, this means: 50 percent of trainees, 45.5 percent of students and almost 40 percent of 30 to 39-year-olds have problems getting out of exhaustion.

The renowned business psychologist Dr. Christina Guthier was the technical supervisor for the study. She also sees the results of the survey as questionable, as she explains in an interview with the star: "If more than a third of people say I can no longer get rid of exhaustion, then there is a risk that a large part of it will in the next ten years will suffer clinically relevant or pathological sequelae." In other words, the risk of burnout, depression and other stress-related illnesses increases.

Fatigue is not only problematic in the moment, but can harm us in the long term. But what actually makes us so tired? The survey also provides important information for this. Similar to other studies in the field, work is the number one reason for exhaustion among professionals. The main causes of exhaustion on the job are pressure to perform (56.3 percent), time pressure (43.1 percent) and the sheer amount of work (41.2 percent).

A clear warning signal for Scheuermann: "If we take all the factors together, then we quickly see that we are currently wasting an enormous number of workers." Employees who are then absent, which in turn leads to an additional burden on the other employees. But what can we do about workplace fatigue? Business psychologist Christina Guthier gave the star eight tips against exhaustion on the job.

Tip 1: Know the cause and effect of work stress

"Work stressors and exhaustion reinforce each other, which can create a vicious cycle," explains Guthier. So far, research has mainly assumed that work stressors lead to exhaustion. However, the business psychologist was able to show in earlier studies that the effect of exhaustion on work stressors is about twice as strong. This means that when we are exhausted, we perceive work stress much more intensively and find it more strenuous. When we are aware of this, we can better understand – and address – the cause of our fatigue.

Tip 2: Go to root cause analysis

There are numerous reasons for exhaustion: The world situation, conflicts in relationships, physical illnesses or hormone fluctuations - and yes, of course, the job. But before we blame our exhaustion solely on our work, we should question ourselves critically: How is my body, do I actually treat myself with respect or are there any conflicts that are currently occupying me? All of this can make us tired. To be on the safe side, it is always worth ruling out physical causes.

Tip 3: Take a critical look at the general conditions at the employer

Christine Guthier is certain: exhaustion from work is a structural problem. This means that the general conditions at work often lead to us being drained. If physical causes can be ruled out and there are no stressors to be found outside of everyday work, then it is worth taking a look at the structures in the company: What is the management style like, is there a lot of time pressure and what aspirations do I have when I go to work myself? It's no secret that perfectionism often leads to exhaustion rather than consistently perfect work results. For Guthier, one thing is clear: "We will have to organize work differently in the future. For example, by reducing the number of meetings and reducing internal company bureaucracy."

Tip 4: Maintain an appreciative relationship with colleagues Appreciation, Guthier is sure, can protect us from exhaustion. Often, however, this is not broadcast by the management level. It is all the more important that we treat our colleagues with respect. Be helpful and praise small and big successes. At the same time, this ensures a good working atmosphere. And those who feel good at work have more energy.

Tip 5: Be open about your own exhaustion

"Anyone who feels exhausted from work should first seek a conversation with the manager or perhaps familiar colleagues," advises Christina Guthier in an interview with the star. But she adds a caveat: Employees should only contact their boss if the risk of stigma is low. However, if the working conditions are toxic and there is no improvement in sight, a job change should also be considered, according to Guthier.

Tip 6: Set your own limits and stick to them

Knowing your own limits and enforcing them is often difficult, especially in day-to-day work. An extra task here, an extra hour there – you are happy to do it for your dear colleagues. In moderation, that's perfectly fine, but according to Guthier, it shouldn't get the upper hand. Incidentally, this also applies to the news consumption, which robs us of a lot of energy. "For example, I'm a big fan of deactivating push notifications. This gives me back control over my media consumption," says the business psychologist.

Tip 7: Find the right recovery strategy for you

Christina Guthier never tires of emphasizing: recovery is individual. "It's not good for everyone not to think about work after work. Some people prefer to integrate private life and work and can even relax better than if they try to force their thoughts away from their job." Instead of sticking to the norm and compulsively trying to slow down with meditation or other relaxation exercises, just listen to yourself and do whatever you feel like after work. Recovery is essential for a healthy life, because Guthier is certain: "Because we have so many crises in the world, we will not succeed in establishing a world without exhaustion."

Tip 8: Learn to distinguish good from bad fatigue

Yes, there is a good exhaustion. Perhaps you know situations in which you come home exhausted after a long day at work, collapse on the sofa and are somehow satisfied with yourself - because you have achieved everything you set out to do or have achieved an important goal. This is the sunny side of exhaustion. "Recognizing these and getting involved can help us a lot," says Guthier, "part of which is celebrating success appropriately."

Source: Fatigue study by Auctority and polling firm Civey

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