20-year-old Emma was fired when she went from the guard to visit his acute and seriously ill grandfather

Mix the union around it. that was the gist of the message, as the 20-year-old barista Emma Lodberg got from his leader, the day she was fired from her positio

20-year-old Emma was fired when she went from the guard to visit his acute and seriously ill grandfather

Mix the union around it.

that was the gist of the message, as the 20-year-old barista Emma Lodberg got from his leader, the day she was fired from her position as a barista at Espresso House.

"My manager asks if I'm a member of a trade union, for them, will she have that I mix around it. She would not have, that my firing had to be for something big," says Emma Lodberg.

Two days before the firing was Emma at work in the Espresso House, when she suddenly got a call from his mother. Emma's maternal grandfather had been hospitalized with a serious stroke in the brain stem.

"I'll call my manager and tell it all, and she says that I should hurry me back to my grandfather," says Emma.

Two days later, the change emma's head, however, according to Emma, sense, and she writes a text message to Emma, where it says that they must have a 'alvorssnak'.

"Yes, I can just as well just start with that give you your termination," she says to me in to the conversation. "She says that it was irresponsible of me, that I was gone from the guard with my grandfather," says Emma.

It is here, Emma Lodbergs former leader in the Espresso House brings the trade union on the track.

"When my leader said, I had to mix my union around, I knew that she and the Espresso House had not their clear. There had to be something wrong. It was not a durable fyringsgrundlag," says Emma, who contacted the 3F after the dismissal.

Emma Lodberg is not only about his bad experiences with the Espresso House. B. T. has earlier told about the 23-year-old Emmely Kobbernagel, which broke down in front of the guests in the middle of the Espresso House under a guard.

In the wake of Swedish following the split revelations of reprehensible working conditions at the Espresso House in Sweden has B. T. studied, about the same proportion prevails in the kaffegigantens Danish coffee shops.

B. T. has talked with 24 former and current Espresso House-servants, which paints a similar picture of a workplace where it is everyday that the baristas breaks down under a guard.

A workplace, where it apparently is common practice to ask employees to appear at work in spite of illness as well as to let the baristas perform overtime work without giving the rightful addition.

Emma Lodberg also tells to B. T., that in the basement for Espresso House hung a slip of paper, which the employees could record the overtime.

In the leaflet stood the words 'voluntary merarbejde' despite the fact that the employees are entitled to the supplement for overtime through the Espresso Houses agreement with 3F.

"By writing the hours on the slip of paper, so we wrote that we didn't have to get the supplement, that is, it was voluntary merarbejde. No one will be informed that it is what we write on, we are just asked to write it on the slip."

the Banknote is, according to Emma Lodberg, the only opportunity to register overtime.

Especially because the 24 former and current Espresso House-the employees are young people, who typically have worked at Espresso House in their gap year, so are they extra vulnerable and easy to exploit, points to the 3F.

"There is no doubt that young people are easier to exploit than older skilled. It takes great strength for a young man to stand up against an adult and perhaps unfair or tough employer. A strength, the young people do not always have, and by employers," says Lone Søgaard, forhandlingssekretær in 3F Privat Service, Hotel and Catering.

B. T. has been 3F the experiences of the 24 former and current Espresso House-servants have described, including Espresso House leaders have asked the staff meeting at work despite illness:

"It is appalling that young people are pressed to get to work, even if they are sick. It is in itself the expression of a very sick culture. It belongs no place in a proper business," says Lone Søgaard.

B. T. have tried to get an interview with the Espresso Houses director, Claus Forester, but Espresso House will only express themselves in writing through a spokesperson.

'sometimes fails, we as the employer, and in those cases it is crucial for us to pick up, so that we can improve ourselves as a workplace. Our priority now is therefore to look inward and take even better care of our colleagues, so we ensure that they all experience the Espresso House as a great place to work.'

Updated Date: 23 November 2019, 19:00

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